Posts Tagged ‘reconciliation’

“I am not my belief system.”

Just watched a video that put words to something I’ve been feeling for a while now.  It’s a conversation between Spencer Burke and Tim King about several aspects of religion including the presence of doomsday scenarios in most of the world’s religions and the propensity to convert a person of a different belief system rather than contribute to his or her worldview.  I urge you to check this video out … it’s only 5 minutes long, and it touches on some issues that will become more and more important to grasp as our reality becomes more and more pluralistic.  I don’t believe these are purely reactionary principles (to the reality of pluralism), I’m beginning to see that viewing reality from this vantage point actually contributes to a better way of living. As Tim King says, when we back up and realize that we are not our belief systems (our belief systems are actually pointers — not “the point” — to a higher reality), we can meet with others beyond our belief systems and begin to realize not just peace, but celebration.  That’s the kind of life I want to live.  Thoughts welcome, as always!

Sorry, but I can’t figure out how to embed this type of video. You’ll have to click over to another page to view the video. Link.

Break Bread.

Sometimes, advertising just flat-out gets it right.

As in the case of the Panera Bread ad that appeared in Thursday’s USA Today.  It’s a vision of a day in which polar opposites, bitter enemies, “lions and lambs” sit down together.  Of course, Christians know this day is on its way, and that our joy is seeing glimpses of this reconciliation in the here and now.

Here’s the ad … let me know if you can’t read the text:

Break Bread.

Since it’s Christmas, this reminds me of the poignant story of German and British soldiers who called a “Christmas Truce” in the trenches of World War I, climbing out of their fox holes to drink wine, share cigarettes, and sing carols.

Breaking bread. There may not be a more important act in the universe, especially when it facilitates reconciliation.  May it be so this Christmas.