sunday, lazy sunday…

604428_87312868.jpgOK, so I’m convinced that my friend Miller is a genius. He just might be the most profound theologian I’ve ever known. Don’t let his wardrobe and Texas drawl fool ya … this guy is a thinker. I want you all to go read today’s post. He touches on many of the things that we discuss regularly around here. The difference is that he puts it much more concisely than I ever have (and I’m supposed to be the writer!).

Miller’s also a wonderful father, so go back through his blog archives and check out his journey as a dad. The proof is in the three (going on four) incredible children (he would call them disciples) he and his wife are raising.

Here’s to you, Miller. Miss you, my friend.

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Related to Miller’s topic, I have really been encouraged (and convicted) by this article at www.theofframp.org. Since coming to Boston, we have been tormented and pestered by a single, seemingly harmless question:

“where do you go to church?”

Because we have intentionally chosen not to attend a traditional church here in Boston (instead choosing to be the church with the Christian / pre-Christian friends we’ve made, as well as to use our Sundays as intentional Sabbath time), we often find ourselves stumbling over our answer to that 6-word query.

“uh, well…um…we’re not really a part of a formal church community right now…”

or

“well, we’re trying to start something in our neighborhood…”

or

“…we set aside our Sundays for intentional rest, and going to church often hinders that…”

Why is that question so hard to answer? Why does a flood of guilt come over us everytime we hear those words? A better question might be why we hold church attendance (at a building, a set time, using our standards and definitions for “church”) so highly, and why we are so quick to hold others to our standards?

Some have even told me that when they left the institutionalized church, they immediately felt marginalized and sub-Christian in their former circles.

I think the above article (“Detoxing from Church”) holds many — but not all — of the answers to that question. So I’d encourage you to read it and tell me what you think.

If you have a suggestion for how we could better answer that question, I’ll take that too …

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